Promotion Underway for Muskegon County AED Scavenger Hunt

July 31, 2017 1:03 pm
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Jerry Evans, MD, Chief of Emergency Medicine at Mercy Health Muskegon, along with fourth-year ED resident, Amanda Paden, DO and the West Michigan Regional Medical Control (WMRMC) are spearheading efforts to locate each and every AED (Automated External Defibrillator) device in Muskegon County. Dr. Evans and the Coalition are on a mission to make sure that cardiac response times are lowered by proactively locating every AED in our county, and urging everyone to become trained in bystander CPR. In order to promote this effort, and make it more fun for participants, they’re offering cash prizes for participating.

This effort hits close to home, as earlier this year, Mercy Health patient, Michael Thaler’s life was saved after a cardiac incident by three Mercy Health Muskegon off-duty nurses who sent bystanders running in search for an AED. The nurses started CPR immediately until the AED was located nearby, which is what ultimately saved his life.

Dr. Evans and the Coalition are on a mission to make sure that cardiac response times are lowered by proactively locating every AED in our county, and urging everyone to become trained in bystander CPR. In order to promote this effort, and make it more fun for participants, they’re offering cash prizes for participating. Now through the end of August, community members are encouraged to scour local establishments in true scavenger-hunt style, and when one is located, register the device on the group’s website.

Once devices are registered, a database will be made available through Muskegon County Dispatch 9-1-1, of all active AED locations, so that when someone calls during an emergency —the dispatcher will be able to direct the called to the nearest AED location. Currently, this resource does not exist. There is a strong correlation between the time from collapse due to cardiac arrest, defibrillation and survival. More than half of all patients defibrillated in less than 3 minutes will survive, compared to just 1 in 5 defibrillated after 10 minutes, which is often how long it takes for EMS to be called, respond and deliver the life-saving shock. So having a publicly accessible AED could truly mean the difference between life and death.

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